Team Marty’s Wins the Highlands Gran Fondo

This past weekend Team Marty’s competed in the Giordana Gran Fondo
National Series in Butler NJ with hopes of a team win as well as putting
one of us on the top step of the podium for the overall.  The team
roster included Joe Petillo, Stefan Tessoun, Dan Montgomery and  Victor
Schepisi. Despite some nasty weather the plan was executed perfectly. Team Marty’s
was awarded first place in the Team Category, Dan Montgomery second place in the
Men’s Category and Victor Schepisi as the 2016 Highlands Gran Fondo
Champion

 

Next stop Gran Fondo NJ Sept 11 2016.

Vic Destroys the NJ State Championship MTB Race!

Team Marty’s Victor Schepisi had a great weekend of racing. He won the NJ State Championship Cat 1 title at  The Rumble in the Jungle H2H XC MTB race #3.   Here’s a quick recap.

Jungle Habitat is known for punchy climbs, rocks and roots and with the rain the night before I knew I had a chance to win if I could stay upright.  The start was a bit hectic but once the race settled down I knew I had to attack. I found an opportunity to pass, dropped the hammer and never looked back.  The race was nearly two hours of pure torture with my avg HR reading 175 bpm.   The last 15 minutes was the hardest mentally being so much can go wrong in a race with a flat or mechanical but my Trek Superfly FS didn’t miss a beat.  It took me 2 years of hard work to win one of these races. I was close many times, but this weekend it all came together.

vicracevicpodiumchampNice work Vic!

Nikki’s Rapha Women’s 100k Road Ride

We had wonderful weather and great group of women for the Rapha Women’s 100K. Over a dozen strong female cyclists rolled out from Marty’s in Morristown and rode all the way out through the beautiful roads of Mendham, Peapack, Far Hills and Tewksbury (to name just a few of the towns we passed through on the ride). For many of the women who joined us, this was their longest ride of the year.

On the road

On the road

We had a diverse group of cyclists, including triathletes, endurance cyclists, cyclists who are newer to long distance riding, and even the recently crowned category two national mountain bike champ! The group was very friendly and supportive and we worked diligently to keep our whole group together as well as dealing with a few mechanical issues along the way. 🙂

 

Cookies + Bikes = Smiles

Cookies + Bikes = Smiles

 

 

Marty's Women's 100k Pit Stop

This was a fun, scenic and inspirational ride to all who joined us. Hopefully rides like this will continue to inspire more women to ride and to push their limits.

Awesome Group

Awesome Group

 

Preparing for your First Race (Or Big Event)

So your friends have egged you on and you begrudgingly registered for your first bike race, triathlon, or  charity ride.  Well it’s months away so you don’t have to worry about anything other than getting in shape right?  Yes, but…

Aside from getting into shape, riding miles, possibly running and swimming, you’ll want to make sure that you and your gear are ready to go for race day.  This means more than just putting your bike on the car rack and going.

The first priority is making sure your bike is in good shape, is clean, and fits properly.  We can help you with this.  If you aren’t sure, bring it in!  We offer an exceptional fitting service and can tune your bike up so it rides like new.  If your equipment isn’t working properly it can completely ruin your race or event.

The next priority is you.  You are important!  Spend the appropriate time planning for the event, and ask questions like:  What will the weather be like?  How long (not distance but hours) do you expect to be riding?  Do your existing accessories offer everything you might need for that day?  How much do you need to eat/drink during the event?

If you find you don’t know the answers to these questions, you can always ask the race promoter, or even come in to your local bike shop for advice.  The most important thing to do when it comes to preparation is experimentation!  Try a few different nutritional products during your training and figure out which products work the best for you.    The same goes for clothing. Remember you go the fastest when you’re comfortable.

So you’ve prepared, and you know your stuff.  Your Salted Caramel Gu’s are ready to go into the back pocket of your favorite jersey and your bottles filled with Lemon Lime Hammer Heed are chilling in the refrigerator for tomorrow morning.

Make a list of everything you need to bring and check it while you’re packing up the car.  The feeling is pretty awful when you get there and realize you’ve forgotten your bike! (Believe me, it’s happened.)

When you’re lined up at the starting line, feeling good about yourself and your bike, just remember to relax.  Even experienced racers often forget this.  It’s just cycling, and all about the fun.

addtext_com_MTU0ODA2ODc2OTQ

 

 

Register here!

Team Marty’s at Tour de Lake Hopatcong

 

Leo, Paul Vic and Nikki receiving their awards at the Tour de Lake Hopatcong

Leo, Paul, Vic and Nikki receiving their awards at the Tour de Lake Hopatcong

We had a great turnout at the Tour de Lake Hopatcong this past Saturday. It was a challenging 40 mile ride with a couple climbs that really hurt.

Leo rode strong and was able to put down a final effort to secure the fastest time on the course.

Paul got 2nd place without much training time, but he did cross-country ski quite often this winter.

Vic got 2nd in the 45+ finishing with the final group.

Nikki was able to grab 4th place and rode strong as she always does.

Great job to everyone who challenged themselves and finished the ride.

 

Ray’s MTB Park Ohio Road Trip

There was vacation time to burn, but terrible, horrible, awful, east coast weather in the way.  (The weather may actually have been nice, I can’t remember.)  Either way, I needed a change, from the monotony of solo road rides and lapping the same mtb trails over and over again.  It was time to get out of town and do something that no man has ever done before.  (In reality many men, women, and children have done this before, but doesn’t it sound more exciting the other way?)

On preparing for a BMX trip, there is an ever evolving list of things to bring with you.  It is as follows:

  1. RedBull– A necessity for any journey.  They say it gives you wings, but the evidence of that comes from a cartoon commercial, so we can’t rule it out, however can’t prove it to be true in a controlled environment either.
  2. Animal Can I Eat? Soundtrack– This got me stoked for riding as a teenager and still does trick now, especially the Stephen Hamilton part.
  3. Malt Liquor–  No BMX trip is complete without a tallboy of Steel Reserve or better yet a Colt 45. Even if you don’t imbibe in the earthly pleasures of alcohol, you can still throw the full, unopened can at aggressive drivers, or rig up your own roller system in the hotel room.
  4. Your Bike–  This is sometimes overlooked, and when it is your day takes a downward spiral fast. (Actually at Ray’s you don’t even have to bring your bike, they have really nice rentals of MTB, BMX, or 26” Dirt Jumpers.)
  5. Tire Tubes– If you have them with you, you won’t get a flat.  This is Newton’s Law of tube poppage.

So I got these things together along with spirit of wonder and adventure, and got into my car and drove to Cleveland, OH.  The drive is very easy.  It’s literally one road for like 600 miles, and then you do some windy, twisty, turns through the manufacturing area of Cleveland and arrive at Ray’s MTB.

After a six hour drive, I dropped my stuff off at a hostel and went straight to the park.  There was no time  to waste on things like dinner or rest.  The park is enormous. I can’t even describe the magnitude.  They have bike trails, pump tracks, skinnies, ramp rooms, street spines, and very very big jumps. Everything looks smaller on the GoPro… Just Sayin.

There are also a great things to do in downtown Cleveland, like going to local breweries and museums. (The Cleveland Art Museum is free by the way.)

In short, whether you ride a mountain bike, a BMX bike, or a road bike, a trip to Ray’s is a must. They have everything to keep beginners and experts shredding the gnar and having fun. So if you get the chance, do it!

Marty Cross – An Introduction to the Oddity of Cyclocross

Marty looks good in blue!

What is cyclocross? It is a kooky sport for sure, originating in the early 1900’s in Europe.  Professional road racers would often race each other from one town to another.  The catch was, they were allowed to cut through farmer’s fields, hop fences, and carry their bikes up and over obstacles to shorten the distance they had to ride.  For them it was a way to have fun and stay in shape during the winter months.  When the Frenchmen Octave Lapize won the Tour de France in 1910, he told the media that his amazing fitness was due to cyclocross training in the off-season.    Since then the sport has taken off and blossomed into a whole new way to race a bicycle.

Matthew Tyler aka “The Bearded Knight” demonstrating perfect barrier technique.

Now, in an effort to emulate these old school “field races,” we create short 2.5km courses in fields that utilize sections of grass, mud, and pavement.  Instead of fences, we put up barriers that are low enough to step over, but high enough so that most riders will have to dismount, carry their bicycles over, and then remount at speed.

The races are done on bicycles that look very similar to road bikes, but have wider, knobby tires to grip the grass and slog through the unforgiving mud.  Racers often bring two bikes with them and leave one in the “pit.”  The pit is a place in the middle of the course where a racer can change bikes in case of a mechanical failure.  These races are done by time ranging from 30 minutes to one hour.

Spectators be hecklin’!

Spectators are often encouraged to heckle riders during the race and give out “hand-ups” to riders which may include dollar bills, beers, Mallomars, or just about anything to entice a rider to go faster than the person next to him/her.

Racing in these events is one thing, but being part of the planning, set-up, and tear down is tough, but extremely rewarding when it all comes together.  One of the best parts of Marty Cross 2013 was definitely the Kid’s Race.

We had a blast at Marty Cross this year and worked hard to set up a great course and atmosphere.

Uncle Ben!

Staking, Taping, Getting the van stuck on the hill…

Thanks to all who attended and helped out.  It was great because of you!  You can find more pictures and media from the race on our Facebook page.